Who we are

We are a group of scientists at the Cavendish Lab, University of Cambridge, UK. Our research is focused on understanding transport processes through membranes.

The physics of ions, macromolecules and particles in confined geometries at the single molecule/-particle level is of particular interest. We exert maximum control over all parameters in our experiments using several techniques: DNA (origami) self-assembly, optical trapping, particle tracking, fluorescence microscopy, electrophysiology, or micro-/nanofluidics, often in combination.

Our interdisciplinary team combines researchers with expertise in physics, engineering, physical chemistry, biochemistry/biology, and micro- and nanofabrication.

In case you are interested in working with us, please get in touch with Ulrich by email: ufk20 (at) cam.ac.uk.

We gratefully acknowledge funding of our work from various sources including:

Logo ERC Logo EPSRC Logo BBSRC
Logo NanoDTC Logo Noether Logo ONT

News

05/8/2020 Summer Update

After the closure of the Cavendish Lab in March 2020 it has finally reopened since Mid June. Despite the lock-down we have published new research:
Diana built a DNA enzyme with lipid flipping rates tuned by structure published in Nano Letters. A collaboration with the Pagliara Lab and others from Exeter - lead by Jehangir - introduces a new Lab Chip system to study drug uptake in single bacteria. Finally, Michael published parts of his finished PhD (congrats!) in BBA-Biomembranes.
We also celebrated the successful completion of three PhDs over the last months with Nik, Michael and Will all now starting life in new (postdoc) jobs. Good luck and thank you very much for your great work!


01/5/2020 Published in Science Advances: Direct detection of molecular intermediates from first-passage times


We show for a diverse range of experimental systems that analysis of dynamics can reveal details of a governing energy landscape, in collaboration with the Bayley group and Ritort group relying on the theoretical analysis by Anatoly Kolomeisky. Great work with great collaborators, Alice!


30/3/2020 Published online in Nano Letters: Nanopore-Based DNA Hard Drives for Rewritable and Secure Data Storage


Kaikai, Jinbo and Filip introduce DNA Hard Drives: rewritable digital storage in DNA that can be read with our solid-state nanopores and easily assembled without synthesis from existing building blocks. In addition without the correct key data cannot be read! Phy.Org featured our work in an excellent article by Anna Demming.


19/3/2020 Published in Applied Materials Today: Aerosol-jet printing facilitates the rapid prototyping of microfluidic devices withversatile geometries and precise channel funct
Kareem and Jehangir worked with the lab of Sohini Kar-Narayan in (Materials) to improve printing of microfluidics. Congratulations!